That Frederiksdal was to become a 'wine castle' happened by chance. Landowner Harald Krabbe had 24 hectares of Stevnskirsebær, which he sold to the juice industry. He actually wanted to tear up the trees, because the settlement prices were miserable, but in 2006 he was randomly visited by chef Jan Friis-Mikkelsen and journalist Morten Brink Iwersen. They had little knowledge of the area's good cherries - and a great love for wine production. It became a very crucial meeting. The three made a decision. In future, the good cherries should be processed in Frederiksdal instead of ending up in the anonymous juice market. There would be life and jobs back to the estate - and then they would prove that Danish agriculture itself could produce luxury and high quality - instead of supplying quantities to industry.

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That Frederiksdal was to become a 'wine castle' happened by chance. Landowner Harald Krabbe had 24 hectares of Stevnskirsebær, which he sold to the juice industry. He actually wanted to tear up the trees, because the settlement prices were miserable, but in 2006 he was randomly visited by chef Jan Friis-Mikkelsen and journalist Morten Brink Iwersen. They had little knowledge of the area's good cherries - and a great love for wine production. It became a very crucial meeting. The three made a decision. In future, the good cherries should be processed in Frederiksdal instead of ending up in the anonymous juice market. There would be life and jobs back to the estate - and then they would prove that Danish agriculture itself could produce luxury and high quality - instead of supplying quantities to industry.